COMMON AILMENTS HOME REMEDIES HERBAL REMEDIES HERBAL MEDICINES ARTICLES
WELCOME TO HOME-REMEDIES.INFO

Acidophilus
Almond
Aloe
Ajowan
Arjun
Aniseed
Ashoka
Ash Gaurd
Asafoetida
Ash
Angelica
Androstenedione
Butcher Broom
Bael
Babool
Bamboo
Banana
Banyan
Betel
Betel Nuts
Bitter Gourd
Black Pepper
Black Plum
Camphor
Carrot
Curd
Black Root
Burdock
Benzoin
Cardamom
Chondroitin
Cinnamon
Chaulmoogra Oil
Dock Yellow
Dill
Eucalyptus
Eyebright
Ephedra
Elderberry
Euphorbiaceae
Fenugreek
Fig
Garlic
Gingelly
Ginger
Gooseberry
Grapes
Henna
Hogweed
Holy Basil
Honey


 

Saffron - Side Effects, Recommended and Precautions of Use

Taxonomic class

Iridaceae.

Common Forms

Available as crude powder.

Source

Saffron is derived from the dried stigmas and tops of styles of Crocus sativus, which is indigenous to southern Europe and Asia Minor.

Chemical Components

Saffron contains several compounds, including carotenoids such as crocines, crocetins, picrocrocin, and dimethyl-crocetin. Hydrolysis of the agent results in the production of safranal and glucose. An essential oil may also be produced.

Actions

The components of saffron have been shown to be cytotoxic in vitro to human carcinoma, sarcoma, and leukemia cells . This effect is believed to be dose-dependent and attributed to the carotenoid components, specifically dimethyl-crocetin. The crocetin component of saffron appears to increase the diffusion of oxygen in plasma, possibly by as much as 80% . This action may prevent atherosclerosis secondary to vascular wall hypoxia and a subsequent decrease in RBC diffusion of oxygen. Antioxidant properties were later described in humans in a study of 20 patients . Fifty-milligram doses of saffron dissolved in milk and given twice daily significantly reduced mean lipoprotein oxidation susceptibility for 10 healthy patients and 10 patients with existing coronary disease as compared with their own baseline data. The ultimate clinical significance of this effect is unknown.

Saffron also is reported to have immunomodulating effects, but supporting data are lacking.

Reported uses

Saffron has been used as a diaphoretic, an expectorant, and a sedative. In some parts of Asia, it has been made into a paste and used to treat dry skin. It is also thought to have some aphrodisiac effects. Clinical trials supporting these claims do not exist. Its Use is primarily as a coloring and flavoring agent.

Dosage

No consensus exists. Saffron may be ingested by mixing the powder with food or brewing it as a tea.

Adverse Reactions

None reported with culinary doses (under 1.5 g). The fOllowing reactions have been documented with doses above 5 g:

CNS: vertigo.

CV: bradycardia.

EENT: epistaxis.

GI: vomiting.

GU: menorrhagia (less frequent).

Skin: facial flushing.

Other: spontaneous abortion (rare).

Interactions

None reported.

Contraindications and Precautions

Saffron is contraindicated in pregnant women because of the risk of spontaneous abortion. Avoid using this compound in breast-teeding patients; effects are unknown.

Special Considerations

  • Recommend that the patient maintain doses of less than 5 g daily to minimize the risk of adverse reactions.

  • Instruct the patient to immediately report unusual signs or symptoms to his primary health care provider.

  • Inform the patient that evidence to support therapeutic applications for saffron is insufficient and that its risks are not well described.

Points of Interest

  • A combination of saffron with quinine and opium has received a patent in Germany for inhibiting premature ejaculation.

Commentary

Although saffron has been used safely as a food additive for many years, its use as a medicinal agent remains to be determined. Until adequate human trials can be conducted, the use of saffron to prevent or treat cancer or CV conditions cannot be recommended.

   

Web Home-Remedies.Info
Bistort
Blue Flag
Fennel
Flax
Galangal
Glucosamine
Gossypol
Indigo
Irish Moss
Jojoba
Khat
Khella
Lady's Mantle
Lovage
Red Poppy
Rose Hips
Rosemary
Saffron
Spirulina
Stone Root
Sweet Violet
Thyme
True Unicorn Root
Wild Ginger
Wild Yam
Witch Hazel

HOME REMEDIES | CONTACT US | HERBAL BLOG

Disclaimer: This website is not intended to provide any professional medical advice and is for educational purposes only. The publisher of this site is not liable for any misconception or misuse of the information provided leading to bad results. Never use any home remedy or other self treatment without being advised to do so by a physician.
This website and the information contained herein, has not been approved by the Food and Drug Administration.